Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Menu

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2021

​In Singapore, breast cancer remains the leading cancer among women. It is also the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Between 2014 and 2018, about six breast cancer cases were diagnosed each day1. One in 13 Singaporean women will develop breast cancer before the age of 752, and although the disease tends to affect women who are older, one in six are younger than 45 years old2.

Beat Breast Cancer with Mammogram, Monthly Breast Self-Examination & Good Lifestyle Habits

Due to the ongoing pandemic, the National BCAM Organising Committee, comprising the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS), Breast Cancer Foundation (BCF), Health Promotion Board (HPB), National University Cancer Institute, Singapore (NCIS), Singapore Cancer Society (SCS) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), together with SingHealth Duke-NUS Breast Centre, Singapore General Hospital (SGH), KKH Women’s and Children’s Hospital (KKH), Sengkang General Hospital (SKH) and Changi General Hospital (CGH) are organising a series of online events to raise awareness of breast cancer and encourage women to play an active role in their breast health by going for mammogram screenings, doing breast self-examinations at home and adopting a healthy lifestyle.

Mammogram: Buddy Up to Beat Breast Cancer

Anyone can be an advocate in the fight against breast cancer, and no one should be fighting it alone. That is why this year, women are encouraged to schedule for their mammogram with their best friend or a female family member and beat breast cancer with early detection via mammograms. The national mammogram screening programme has resumed and precautions are in place to ensure the safety of patients during breast checks and cancer treatment.

Breast Screening Programmes in Singapore

  • Screen For Life

    Regular mammogram screening is the best defense against breast cancer, as detecting breast cancer early can lead to increased chances of survival. The HPB recommends women aged 50 years and above to go for mammogram screening once every two years3.

    Through the national Breast Cancer Screening Programme under HPB’s Screen for Life, women aged 50 years and above can enjoy subsidised mammogram screenings at participating breast screening centres. Before subsidies, a typical mammogram would cost $138 (before GST). To be eligible for the subsidies, women should be Singapore Citizens and Permanent Residents, asymptomatic and have not had a mammogram in the last two years.

    To register for a mammogram screening by BreastScreen Singapore, please click here. For more information on breast cancer screening programmes and subsidy eligibility, please click here.

  • SCS $25 Funding Assistance for Mammogram Screening

    From 1st October till 30th November 2021, women who are eligible can receive a funding assistance of $25 from SCS for their mammogram screening.

    Women who have their mammograms done at HPB’s Screen for Life breast screening centres (Polyclinic) will expect to pay $25 (for Singapore Citizens) and $50 (for Permanent Residents), after prevailing government subsidies and SCS’ funding assistance. For mammogram screenings done at participating private breast screening centres, SCS will further defray the screening cost by $25.

    To qualify for funding assistance, appointments must be made at participating breast screening centres by 15th November 2021, and the mammogram screening must be done by 30th November 2021. Funding assistance eligibility and a full listing of the clinics can be found here.


Breast Self-Examination: Do It Monthly

Breast cancer is painless especially during the early stage. In fact, there may be no symptoms at all when breast cancer first develops. Women are encouraged to perform breast self-examinations monthly and seek medical attention when they experience any changes in their breast. They should not delay a visit to the doctor out of fears about COVID-19 because early diagnosis and treatment of breast lumps/cancer can save lives.

Good Lifestyle Habits: Take Charge of Your Health

Women are encouraged to adopt healthier lifestyles to reduce their risk of breast cancer: eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, maintain a healthy weight, drink alcohol in moderation, limit the consumption of processed meats, quit smoking and exercise regularly. Studies have shown that 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week can reduce the risks of breast cancer incidence by 9%4.

Let us help you get started with taking charge of your health! Join us in our weekly online fitness classes in October. Check out the calendar in the BCAM 2021 Activities below.

BCAM 2021 Activities

Pink Ribbon Virtual Launch Party

Date: 1 October 2021, Friday

Time: 8pm to 8.30pm

Organiser: Singapore Cancer Society

Watch this space to find out how you can join us.

Webinars on Breast Cancer

Join our webinars and learn about the trends of breast cancer, risk factors, signs and symptoms, screening and diagnosis.

  • Living with BRCA
    Date: 2 October 2021, Saturday
    Time: 9am - 11am
    Organiser: National Cancer Centre Singapore
    Register here.

  • Busting Breast Cancer (Part 1)
    Date: 2 October 2021, Saturday
    Time: 10am
    Organisers: Sengkang General Hospital and SingHealth Duke-NUS Breast Centre
    Register here.

  • Busting Breast Cancer (Part 2)
    Date: 9 October 2021, Saturday
    Time: 10am
    Organisers: Sengkang General Hospital and SingHealth Duke-NUS Breast Centre
    Register here.

  • Breast Cancer Webinar (via NCCS Facebook Live)
    Date: 16 October 2021, Saturday
    Time:10.30am - 12pm (English); 2.30pm - 4pm (Mandarin)
    Organisers: Singapore Cancer Society, National Cancer Centre Singapore, Breast Cancer Foundation, Health Promotion Board, National University Cancer Institute, Singapore and Tan Tock Seng Hospital
    Join us at the webinars via NCCS Facebook Live!

  • Life After Breast Cancer
    Date: 23 October 2021, Saturday
    Time: 10am - 11.15am
    Organisers: SingHealth Duke-NUS Breast Centre, Singapore General Hospital, KKH Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Sengkang General Hospital, Changi General Hospital and National Cancer Centre Singapore
    Register here.

  • Conquer Breast Cancer with 3 Simple Steps
    Date: 30 October 2021, Saturday
    Time: 9am - 12pm
    Organisers: SingHealth Duke-NUS Breast Centre, Singapore General Hospital, KKH Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Sengkang General Hospital, Changi General Hospital and National Cancer Centre Singapore
    Register here.

Get Fit in Pink online fitness classes

Join us in our weekly online fitness classes conducted during lunchtimes in October. Register for your preferred classes or all of them! Don’t forget to wear pink for the classes!

Yoga by ActiveSG

12pm - 2pm 

Every Monday

in October

Register here

Fight-Do by Team Axis

12pm - 1pm 

Every Wednesday

in October

Register here 

Sporty Friday

Zumba by Active SG

5pm – 6pm

Register here

 4 Oct 6 Oct​1 Oct
11 Oct 13 Oct ​8 Oct
18 Oct 20 Oct ​ ​
25 Oct 27 Oct 

Special thanks to ActiveSG and Team Axis for coming forward to support this effort of getting us fit and healthy and conducting the classes free of charge!

Pink Plank Challenge

As you keep yourself fit through our online fitness classes, why not join the Pink Plank Challenge and help raise awareness of breast cancer? During the month of October, we encourage you to record yourself planking with a buddy (or buddies) for at least 20 seconds, share your video on Facebook and #pinkplanksg. There are prizes to be won, so watch this space to find out how you can participate in the challenge!

1 Singapore Cancer Registry Annual Report (2014 – 2018)

2 Singapore Cancer Registry 50th Anniversary Monograph (1968 – 2017)

3 Women aged between 40 and 49 years can screen for breast cancer, but they should talk to their doctor about the benefits and limitations of mammograms screening before doing so, to help them make an informed choice.

4 Pizot C, Boniol M, Mullie P et al. Physical activity, hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer risk: A meta-analysis of prospective studies. Eur J Cancer 2016; 52:18-54